Halobetasol

advertisement
When are you taking this medicine?

Halobetasol uses


INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Halobetasol Cream, 0.05% is a super-high potency corticosteroid indicated for the relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses. Treatment beyond two consecutive weeks is not recommended, and the total dosage should not exceed 50 g/week because of the potential for the drug to suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Use in children under 12 years of age is not recommended.

As with other highly active corticosteroids, therapy should be discontinued when control has been achieved. If no improvement is seen within 2 weeks, reassessment of the diagnosis may be necessary.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Halobetasol Cream is contraindicated in those patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components of the preparation.

PRECAUTIONS

General: Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids can produce reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression with the potential for glucocorticosteroid insufficiency after withdrawal of treatment. Manifestations of Cushing's syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria can also be produced in some patients by systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids while on treatment. Patients applying a topical steroid to a large surface area or to areas under occlusion should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression. This may be done by using the ACTH stimulation, A.M. plasma cortisol, and urinary free-cortisol tests. Patients receiving super potent corticosteroids should not be treated for more than 2 weeks at a time and only small areas should be treated at any one time due to the increased risk of HPA suppression. Halobetasol Cream produced HPA axis suppression when used in divided doses at 7 grams per day for one week in patients with psoriasis. These effects were reversible upon discontinuation of treatment. If HPA axis suppression is noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent corticosteroid. Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt upon discontinuation of topical corticosteroids. Infrequently, signs and symptoms of glucocorticosteroid insufficiency may occur requiring supplemental systemic corticosteroids. For information on systemic supplementation, see prescribing information for those products.

Pediatric patients may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity from equivalent doses due to their larger skin surface to body mass ratios (see PRECAUTIONS: Pediatric Use ). If irritation develops, Halobetasol Cream should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. Allergic contact dermatitis with corticosteroids is usually diagnosed by observing failure to heal rather than noting a clinical exacerbation as with most topical products not containing corticosteroids. Such an observation should be corroborated with appropriate diagnostic patch testing. If concomitant skin infections are present or develop, an appropriate antifungal or antibacterial agent should be used. If a favorable response does not occur promptly, use of Halobetasol Cream should be discontinued until the infection has been adequately controlled.

Halobetasol Cream should not be used in the treatment of rosacea or perioral dermatitis, and it should not be used on the face, groin, or in the axillae.

Information for Patients: Patients using topical corticosteroids should receive the following information and instructions:

  • The medication is to be used as directed by the physician. It is for external use only. Avoid contact with the eyes.
  • The medication should not be used for any disorder other than that for which it was prescribed.
  • The treated skin area should not be bandaged, or otherwise covered or wrapped, so as to be occlusive unless directed by the physician.
  • Patients should report to their physician any signs of local adverse reactions.

Laboratory Tests: The following tests may be helpful in evaluating patients for HPA axis suppression:

  • ACTH-stimulation test; A.M. plasma-cortisol test; Urinary free-cortisol test.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility: Long-term animal studies have not been performed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of Halobetasol. Positive mutagenicity effects were observed in two genotoxicity assays. Halobetasol was positive in a Chinese hamster micronucleus test, and in a mouse lymphoma gene mutation assay in vitro. Studies in the rat following oral administration at dose levels up to 50 μg/kg/day indicated no impairment of fertility or general reproductive performance. In other genotoxicity testing, Halobetasol was not found to be genotoxic in the Ames/Salmonella assay, in the sister chromatid exchange test in somatic cells of the Chinese hamster, in chromosome aberration studies of germinal and somatic cells of rodents, and in a mammalian spot test to determine point mutations.

Pregnancy: Teratogenic effects: Pregnancy Category C: Corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic in laboratory animals when administered systemically at relatively low dosage levels. Some corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic after dermal application in laboratory animals. Halobetasol has been shown to be teratogenic in SPF rats and chinchilla-type rabbits when given systemically during gestation at doses of 0.04 to 0.1 mg/kg in rats and 0.01 mg/kg in rabbits. These doses are approximately 13, 33 and 3 times, respectively, the human topical dose of Halobetasol Cream. Halobetasol was embryotoxic in rabbits but not in rats. Cleft palate was observed in both rats and rabbits. Omphalocele was seen in rats, but not in rabbits. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of the teratogenic potential of Halobetasol in pregnant women. Halobetasol Cream should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Nursing Mothers: Systemically administered corticosteroids appear in human milk and could suppress growth, interfere with endogenous corticosteroid production, or cause other untoward effects. It is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids could result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when Halobetasol Cream is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use: Safety and effectiveness of Halobetasol Cream in pediatric patients have not been established and use in pediatric patients under 12 is not recommended. Because of a higher ratio of skin surface area to body mass, pediatric patients are at a greater risk than adults of HPA axis suppression and Cushing's syndrome when they are treated with topical corticosteroids. They are therefore also at greater risk of adrenal insufficiency during or after withdrawal of treatment. Adverse effects including striae have been reported with inappropriate use of topical corticosteroids in infants and children. HPA axis suppression, Cushing's syndrome, linear growth retardation, delayed weight gain and intracranial hypertension have been reported in children receiving topical corticosteroids. Manifestations of adrenal suppression in children include low plasma cortisol levels and an absence of response to ACTH stimulation. Manifestations of intracranial hypertension include bulging fontanelles, headaches, and bilateral papilledema.

Geriatric Use: Of approximately 400 patients treated with Halobetasol Cream in clinical studies, 25% were 61 years and over and 6% were 71 years and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients; and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

advertisement

ADVERSE REACTIONS

In controlled clinical trials, the most frequent adverse events reported for Halobetasol Cream included stinging, burning or itching in 4.4% of the patients. Less frequently reported adverse reactions were: dry skin, erythema, skin atrophy, leukoderma, vesicles and rash. The following additional local adverse reactions are reported infrequently with topical corticosteroids, and they may occur more frequently with high potency corticosteroids, such as Halobetasol Cream. These reactions are listed in an approximate decreasing order of occurrence: folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, secondary infection, striae and miliaria.

OVERDOSAGE

Topically applied Halobetasol Cream can be absorbed in sufficient amounts to produce systemic effects

(see PRECAUTIONS ).

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Apply a thin layer of Halobetasol Cream to the affected skin once or twice daily, as directed by your physician, and rub in gently and completely. Halobetasol Cream is a super-high potency topical corticosteroid; therefore, treatment should be limited to two weeks, and amounts greater than 50 g/wk should not be used. As with other corticosteroids, therapy should be discontinued when control is achieved. If no improvement is seen within two weeks, reassessment of diagnosis may be necessary. Halobetasol Cream should not be used with occlusive dressings.

HOW SUPPLIED

Halobetasol Cream, 0.05% is supplied in the following tube sizes:

15 g NDC 0168-0355-15

50 g NDC 0168-0355-50

Store between 15°-30°C (59°-86°F).

E. FOUGERA & CO.

A division of Fougera Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Melville, New York 11747

I2355C

R05/12

#49

NDC 0168-0355-15

FOUGERA®

HALOBETASOL

PROPIONATE

CREAM, 0.05%

Rx only

FOR DERMATOLOGICAL

USE ONLY.

NOT FOR OPHTHALMIC USE.

Warning: Keep out of

reach of children.

NET WT 15 grams

NDC 0168-0355-15

FOUGERA®

Halobetasol

CREAM, 0.05%

Rx only

FOR DERMATOLOGICAL USE ONLY.

NOT FOR OPHTHALMIC USE.

Warning: Keep out of

reach of children.

NET WT 15 grams

advertisement

Halobetasol pharmaceutical active ingredients containing related brand and generic drugs:

Active ingredient is the part of the drug or medicine which is biologically active. This portion of the drug is responsible for the main action of the drug which is intended to cure or reduce the symptom or disease. The other portions of the drug which are inactive are called excipients; there role is to act as vehicle or binder. In contrast to active ingredient, the inactive ingredient's role is not significant in the cure or treatment of the disease. There can be one or more active ingredients in a drug.


Halobetasol available forms, composition, doses:

Form of the medicine is the form in which the medicine is marketed in the market, for example, a medicine X can be in the form of capsule or the form of chewable tablet or the form of tablet. Sometimes same medicine can be available as injection form. Each medicine cannot be in all forms but can be marketed in 1, 2, or 3 forms which the pharmaceutical company decided based on various background research results.
Composition is the list of ingredients which combinedly form a medicine. Both active ingredients and inactive ingredients form the composition. The active ingredient gives the desired therapeutic effect whereas the inactive ingredient helps in making the medicine stable.
Doses are various strengths of the medicine like 10mg, 20mg, 30mg and so on. Each medicine comes in various doses which is decided by the manufacturer, that is, pharmaceutical company. The dose is decided on the severity of the symptom or disease.


Halobetasol destination | category:

Destination is defined as the organism to which the drug or medicine is targeted. For most of the drugs what we discuss, human is the drug destination.
Drug category can be defined as major classification of the drug. For example, an antihistaminic or an antipyretic or anti anginal or pain killer, anti-inflammatory or so.


Halobetasol Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical codes:

A medicine is classified depending on the organ or system it acts [Anatomical], based on what result it gives on what disease, symptom [Therapeutical], based on chemical composition [Chemical]. It is called as ATC code. The code is based on Active ingredients of the medicine. A medicine can have different codes as sometimes it acts on different organs for different indications. Same way, different brands with same active ingredients and same indications can have same ATC code.


Halobetasol pharmaceutical companies:

Pharmaceutical companies are drug manufacturing companies that help in complete development of the drug from the background research to formation, clinical trials, release of the drug into the market and marketing of the drug.
Researchers are the persons who are responsible for the scientific research and is responsible for all the background clinical trials that resulted in the development of the drug.


advertisement

References

  1. Dailymed."HALOBETASOL PROPIONATE CREAM [E. FOUGERA & CO., A DIVISION OF FOUGERA PHARMACEUTICALS INC.]". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailym... (accessed August 28, 2018).
  2. "Halobetasol". https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/co... (accessed August 28, 2018).
  3. "Halobetasol". http://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB0059... (accessed August 28, 2018).

Frequently asked Questions

Can i drive or operate heavy machine after consuming Halobetasol?

Depending on the reaction of the Halobetasol after taken, if you are feeling dizziness, drowsiness or any weakness as a reaction on your body, Then consider Halobetasol not safe to drive or operate heavy machine after consumption. Meaning that, do not drive or operate heavy duty machines after taking the capsule if the capsule has a strange reaction on your body like dizziness, drowsiness. As prescribed by a pharmacist, it is dangerous to take alcohol while taking medicines as it exposed patients to drowsiness and health risk. Please take note of such effect most especially when taking Primosa capsule. It's advisable to consult your doctor on time for a proper recommendation and medical consultations.

Is Halobetasol addictive or habit forming?

Medicines are not designed with the mind of creating an addiction or abuse on the health of the users. Addictive Medicine is categorically called Controlled substances by the government. For instance, Schedule H or X in India and schedule II-V in the US are controlled substances.

Please consult the medicine instruction manual on how to use and ensure it is not a controlled substance.In conclusion, self medication is a killer to your health. Consult your doctor for a proper prescription, recommendation, and guidiance.

advertisement

Review

sdrugs.com conducted a study on Halobetasol, and the result of the survey is set out below. It is noteworthy that the product of the survey is based on the perception and impressions of the visitors of the website as well as the views of Halobetasol consumers. We, as a result of this, advice that you do not base your therapeutic or medical decisions on this result, but rather consult your certified medical experts for their recommendations.

Visitor reports

Visitor reported useful

No survey data has been collected yet

Visitor reported side effects

No survey data has been collected yet

Visitor reported price estimates

No survey data has been collected yet

Visitor reported frequency of use

No survey data has been collected yet

Visitor reported doses

No survey data has been collected yet

Visitor reported time for results

No survey data has been collected yet

Visitor reported administration

No survey data has been collected yet

Visitor reported age

No survey data has been collected yet

Visitor reviews


There are no reviews yet. Be the first to write one!


Your name: 
Email: 
Spam protection:  < Type 24 here

The information was verified by Dr. Arunabha Ray, MD Pharmacology

© 2002 - 2021 "sdrugs.com". All Rights Reserved